Home and Family

Walk Safely: Tips And Tricks For Cleaning Your Carpet

Whether this is your first time hiring a cleaning company for your carpets or your tenth, more information could never hurt. Knowing what to look for in a cleaning company could help you get a better deal on the service. Use the guide below to find yourself a great company for your carpets.

Ask any company that you contact about carpet cleaning if they have special chemicals for your high traffic areas. In most cases your carpet will be quite clean in every area other than these, so you will likely only need the powerful stuff to be used here. If they do not have such a service you should consider using a different company.

If you have any real problem spots in your carpet, show them to your cleaning professional. Spot cleaning often requires different chemicals and methods, but the professionals are ready to deal with these concerns. If you specifically point them out, you can make sure your cleaning service takes care of them in a way so that they disappear and do not come back once the carpet is dry.

When hiring a carpet cleaning company, ask if the technicians have to undergo any formal training. Many companies use specific methods and products, and you want to make sure the technician knows how to use those things properly. Misusing chemicals can damage your carpets, and methods that are not used correctly can lead to carpets remaining dirty.

Find a company with a legitimate address before you do any hiring. If you run into any issues, you’ll need to have a physical address that you can go to in order to resolve said issues. If a company is using a post office box for their address, look for a different company.

Make sure any company you hire to clean your carpets is insured. Accidents can and do happen. For this reason, you want to make sure your home and belongings are covered in case something unexpected happens. Most legitimate companies are insured, but it never hurts to ask and make sure.

Before settling on a cleaning product, test out a few in unobtrusive sections of your carpet. You must find a company that knows how to clean your carpets well. Once you have found a product or service that works well with your carpet, be sure to continue to use it.

Now, you are ready to get started looking for the company that will get your carpets spotless. You should be happy you have taken the time to learn all that you have just learned. Apply these tips to your search for a cleaner and the results that you get will be flawless.

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Home and Family

EARLY DETECTION OF DISEASE IN THE CHILD.

It is highly important that a mother should possess such information as will enable her to detect disease at its first appearance, and thus insure for her child timely medical assistance. This knowledge it will not be difficult for her to obtain. She has only to bear in mind what are the indications which constitute health, and she will at once see that all deviations from it must denote the presence of disorder, if not of actual disease. With these changes she must to a certain extent make herself acquainted.

Signs of health.
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The signs of health are to be found, first, in the healthy performance of the various functions of the body; the regular demands made for its supply, neither in excess or deficiency; and a similar regularity in its excretions both in quantity and appearance.

If the figure of the healthy infant is observed, something may be learnt from this. There will be perceived such an universal roundness in all parts of the child’s body, that there is no such thing as an angle to be found in the whole figure; whether the limbs are bent or straight, every line forms a portion of a circle. The limbs will feel firm and solid, and unless they are bent, the joints cannot be discovered.

The tongue, even in health, is always white, but it will be free from sores, the skin cool, the eye bright, the complexion clear, the head cool, and the abdomen not projecting too far, the breathing regular, and without effort.

When awake, the infant will be cheerful and sprightly, and, loving to be played with, will often break out into its merry, happy, laugh; whilst, on the other hand, when asleep, it will appear calm, every feature composed, its countenance displaying an expression of happiness, and frequently, perhaps, lit up with a smile.

Just in proportion as the above appearances are present and entire, health may be said to exist; and just in proportion to their partial or total absence disease will have usurped its place.

We will, however, for the sake of clearness examine the signs of disease as they are manifested separately by the countenance, the gestures, in sleep, in the stools, and by the breathing and cough.

Of the countenance.
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In health the countenance of a thild is expressive of serenity in mind and body; but if the child be unwell, this expression will be changed, and in a manner which, to a certain extent, will indicate what part of the system is at fault.

The brows will be contracted, if there is pain, and its seat is in the head. This is frequently the very first outward sign of any thing being wrong, and will occur at the very onset of disease; if therefore remarked at an early period, and proper remedies used, its notice may prevent one of the most fearful of infantile complaints “Water in the Head.”

If this sign is passed by unheeded, and the above disease be threatened, soon the eyes will become fixed and staring, the head hot, and moved uneasily from side to side upon the pillow, or lie heavily upon the nurse’s arm, the child will start in its sleep, grinding its teeth, and awake alarmed and screaming, its face will be flushed, particularly the cheeks (as if rouged), its hands hot, but feet cold, its bowels obstinately costive, or its motions scanty, dark-coloured, and foul.

If the lips are drawn apart, so as to show the teeth or gums, the seat of the pain is in the belly. This sign, however, will only be present during the actual existence of suffering; if, therefore, there be any doubt whether it exist, press upon the stomach, and watch the eifect on the expression of the countenance.

If the pain arise simply from irritation of the bowels excited from indigestion, it will be temporary, and the sign will go and come just as the spasm may occur, and slight remedial measures will give relief.

If, however, the disease be more serious, and inflammation ensue, this sign will be more constantly present, and soon the countenance will become pale, or sallow and sunken, the child will dread motion, and lie upon its back with the knees bent up to the belly, the tongue will be loaded, and in breathing, while the chest will be seen to heave with more than usual effort, the muscles of the belly will remain perfectly quiescent.

If the nostrils are drawn upwards and in quick motion, pain exists in the chest. This sign, however, will generally be the accompaniment of inflammation of the chest, in which case the countenance will be discoloured, the eyes more or less staring, and the breathing will be difficult and hurried; and if the child’s mode of respiring be watched, the chest will be observed to be unmoved, while the belly quickly heaves with every inspiration.

Convulsions are generally preceded by some changes in the countenance. The upper lip will be drawn up, and is occasionally bluish or livid. Then there may be slight squinting, or a singular rotation of the eye upon its own axis; alternate flushing or paleness of the face; and sudden animation followed by languor.

These signs will sometimes manifest themselves many hours, nay days, before the attack occurs; may be looked upon as premonitory; and if timely noticed, and suitable medical aid resorted to, the occurrence of a fit may be altogether prevented.

The state of the eyes should always be attended to. In health they are clear and bright, but in disease they become dull, and give a heavy appearance to the countenance; though after long continued irritation they will assume a degree of quickness which is very remarkable, and a sort of pearly brightness which is better known from observation than it can be from description.

The direction of the eyes, too, should be regarded, for from this we may learn something. When the infant is first brought to the light, both eyes are scarcely ever directed to the same object: this occurs without any tendency to disease, and merely proves, that regarding one object with both eyes is only an acquired habit. But when the child has come to that age when the eyes are by habit directed to the same object, and afterwards it loses that power, this circumstance alone may be looked upon as a frequent prelude to disease affecting the head.

Of the gestures.
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The gestures of a healthy child are all easy and natural; but in sickness those deviations occur, which alone will often denote the nature of the disease.

Suppose an infant to have acquired the power to support itself, to hold its head erect; let sickness come, its head will droop immediately, and this power will be lost, only to be regained with the return of health; and during the interval every posture and movement will be that of languor.

The little one that has just taught itself to run alone from chair to chair, having two or three teeth pressing upon and irritating the gums, will for a time be completely taken off its feet, and perhaps lie languidly in its cot, or on its nurse’s arm.

The legs being drawn up to the belly, and accompanied by crying, are proofs of disorder and pain in the bowels. Press upon this part, and your pressure will increase the pain. Look to the secretions from the bowels themselves, and by their unhealthy character your suspicions, in reference to the seat of the disorder, are at once confirmed.

The hands of a child in health are rarely carried above its mouth; but let there be any thing wrong about the head and pain present, and the little one’s hands will be constantly raised to the head and face.

Sudden starting when awake, as also during sleep, though it occur from trifling causes, should never be disregarded. It is frequently connected with approaching disorder of the brain. It may forebode a convulsive fit, and such suspicion is confirmed, if you find the thumb of the child drawn in and firmly pressed upon the palm, with the fingers so compressed upon it, that the hand cannot be forced open without difficulty. The same condition will exist in the toes, but not to so great a degree; there may also be a puffy state of the back of the hands and feet, and both foot and wrist bent downwards.

There are other and milder signs threatening convulsions and connected with gesture, which should be regarded: the head being drawn rigidly backwards, an arm fixed firmly to the side, or near to it, as also one of the legs drawn stifly upwards. These signs, as also those enumerated above, are confirmed beyond all doubt, if there be present certain alterations in the usual habits of the child: if the sleep is disturbed, if there be frequent fits of crying, great peevishness of temper, the countenance alternately flushed and pale, sudden animation followed by as sudden a fit of languor, catchings of the breath followed by a long and deep inspiration, all so many premonitory symptoms of an approaching attack.

Of the sleep.
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The sleep of the infant in health is quiet, composed, and refreshing. In very early infancy, when not at the breast, it is for the most part asleep in its cot; and although as the months advance it sleeps less, yet when the hour for repose arrives, the child is no sooner laid down to rest, than it drops off into a quiet, peaceful slumber.

Not so, if ill. Frequently it will be unwilling to be put into its cot at all, and the nurse will be obliged to take the infant in her arms; it will then sleep but for a short time, and in a restless and disturbed manner.

If it suffer pain, however slight, the countenance will indicate it; and, as when awake, so now, if there is any thing wrong about the head, the contraction of the eye-brow and grinding of the teeth will appear; if any thing wrong about the belly, the lips will be drawn apart, showing the teeth or gums, and in both instances there will be great restlessness and frequent startings.

Of the stools.
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In the new-born infant the motions are dark coloured, very much like pitch both in consistence and appearance. The first milk, however, secreted in the mother’s breast, acts as an aperient upon the infant’s bowels, and thus in about four-and-twenty hours it is cleansed away.

From this time, and through the whole of infancy, the stools will be of a lightish yellow colour, the consistence of thin mustard, having little smell, smooth in appearance, and therefore free from lumps or white curded matter, and passed without pain or any considerable quantity of wind. And as long as the child is in health, it will have daily two or three, or even four, of these evacuations. But as it grows older, they will not be quite so frequent; they will become darker in colour, and more solid, though not so much so as in the adult.

Any deviation, then, from the above characters, is of course a sign of something wrong; and as a deranged condition of the bowels is frequently the first indication we have of coming disease, the nurse should daily be directed to watch the evacuations. Their appearance, colour, and the manner in which discharged, are the points principally to be looked to. If the stools have a very curdy appearance, or are too liquid, or green, or dark-coloured, or smell badly, they are unnatural. And in reference to the manner in which they are discharged, it should be borne in mind, that, in a healthy child, the motion is passed with but little wind, and as if squeezed out, but in disease, it will be thrown out with considerable force, which is a sign of great irritation. The number, too, of stools passed within the four-and- twenty hours it is important to note, so that if the child does not have its accustomed relief, (and it must not be forgotten that children, although in perfect health, differ as to the precise number,)

Of the breathing and cough
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The breathing of a child in health is formed of equal inspirations and expirations, and it breathes quietly, regularly, inaudibly, and without effort. But let inflammation of the air-tubes or lungs take place, and the inspiration will become in a few hours so quickened and hurried, and perhaps audible, that the attention has only to be directed to the circumstance to be at once perceived.

Now all changes which occur in the breathing from its healthy standard, however slight the shades of difference may be, it is most important should be noticed early. For many of the complaints in the chest, although very formidable in their character, if only seen early by the medical man, may be arrested in their progress; but otherwise, may be beyond the control of art. A parent, therefore, should make herself familiar with the breathing of her child in health, and she will readily mark any change which may arise.

Whenever a child has the symptoms of a common cold, attended by hoarseness and a rough cough, always look upon it with suspicion, and never neglect seeking a medical opinion. Hoarseness does not usually attend a common cold in the child, and these symptoms may be premonitory of an attack of “croup;” a disease excessively rapid in its progress, and which, from the importance of the parts affected, carrying on, as they do, a function indispensably necessary to life, requires the most prompt and decided treatment.

The following observations of Dr. Cheyne are so strikingly illustrative, and so pertinent to my present purpose, that I cannot refrain inserting them: “In the approach of an attack of croup, which almost always takes place in the evening, probably of a day during which the child has been exposed to the weather, and often after catarrhal symptoms have existed for several days, he may be observed to be excited, in variable spirits, more ready than usual to laugh than to cry, a little flushed, occasionally coughing, the sound of the cough being rough, like that which attends the catarrhal stage of the measles. More generally, however, the patient has been for some time in bed and asleep, before the nature of the disease with which he is threatened is apparent; then, perhaps, without waking, he gives a very unusual cough, well known to any one who has witnessed an attack of the croup; it rings as if the child had coughed through a brazen trumpet; it is truly a tussis clangosa; it penetrates the walls and floor of the apartment, and startles the experienced mother, ‘Oh! I am afraid our child is taking the croup!’ She runs to the nursery, finds her child sleeping softly, and hopes she may be mistaken. But remaining to tend him, before long the ringing cough, a single cough, is repeated again and again; the patient is roused, and then a new symptom is remarked; the sound of his voice is changed; puling, and as if the throat were swelled, it corresponds with the cough,” etc.

How important that a mother should be acquainted with the above signs of one of the most terrific complaints to which childhood is subject; for, if she only send for medical assistance during its first stage, the treatment will be almost invariably successful; whereas, if this “golden opportunity” is lost, this disease will seldom yield to the influence of measures, however wisely chosen or perseveringly employed.

Home and Family

Read This Before You Purchase New Furniture

It’s not fun struggling with furniture shopping. This is why this article is here. It’s easy to read and it’s easy to put these tips to use. Read on to find out more.

When purchasing wooden furniture, especially antiques, pay attention to more than just the outside appearance. Open the drawers, look underneath and check the back too. This visual inspection can help you determine the actual condition of the item. Checking the secondary woods will help you learn about the actual age and quality of it.

If you are seeking furniture to use outside, ensure the pieces are constructed properly. Inspect all joints to ensure against weak welds. If you find any welds that look even potentially weak, skip that piece for other, sturdier furniture. It is important that any outdoor furniture you choose can withstand the elements it will be exposed to for many years.

If you eat with your family at the kitchen table, consider one topped with tile. Mess is easy to clean, and you can disinfect the table. Depending on the size and age of your family, choose the seating options that best fit your needs.

Don’t neglect trying some haggling when you buy furniture. Most furniture stores are notorious for marking up their furniture, so when you are considering a piece, consider asking for a twenty percent discount or more. If you’re uncomfortable with haggling, get a friend or family member to shop with you.

Since furniture is a big ticket item, try to buy pieces that have many uses and can adapt to your needs. For example, an armoire is perfect for storing a wireless printer and supplies. Armoires can also be great as an entertainment center as everything can be neatly tucked away and out of sight when not in use.

Know your budget before you shop. Even if you are only buying a single item, the prices can vary from store to store. You can end up spending much more than you can afford if you do not go in with a plan. Understanding your budget constraints from the start will help you make smart decisions.

You might buy your furniture at a major chain store, or you might prefer to buy it at a tiny mom and pop shop. Either way, this advice should help. All big ticket furniture purchases should involve research and careful consideration. With this knowledge on the best ways to shop, you’re ready to put them to use.

Home and Family

Tastier, Cheaper, Healthier Food In Just A Few Simple Steps

Are you a lover of many different kinds of foods? Are you someone that loves to eat sweet things? Or are spicy ethnic dishes what you crave? Do you wonder how you can cook meals such as these at home? It is time to take action and improve your skills. These tips can help you learn how to cook great meals.

Keep your herbs in a place that is both dark and cool. Elements such as light and heat can cause your herbs to lose flavor quickly, resulting in less taste being added to your favorite dishes. Usually herbs and ground spices tend to stay fresh for about a year. Whole spices can keep their flavor for up to five years. Keep spices fresh for the longest time possible by storing them correctly.

If you can, do all the preparing of the meal’s ingredients in advance. Do not start cooking until the prep work is done. Cooking can get stressful when you’re working to deadline. Do the prep work as early as you can to avoid stress later.

Overdo it a little when you bake a pie crust. Go past the usual pale tan color and take them to a caramel gold. The crust changes to the caramel color only after the sugar has had time to caramelize. This will give the crust the sweet flavor you want.

When trying out a new marinade or seasoning, test it on a small piece of meat before you cook the entire meal. Careful seasoning is especially require in meatloaf and meatballs. After you season the meat, do not cook all of the batch. Instead, make a little piece into a patty and cook it first. Then, you can cook the rest of it, or adjust your seasonings as needed.

Do you feel guilty when you toss rotten, uneaten fruit in the garbage? Do you wonder if it would be better to just cut off the moldy parts and save the rest? There is, unfortunately, no good way to save fruit that is half-rotten. Fruit with any mold on it must be discarded because it contains unhealthy organisms.

Using the tips you’ve read here will help you to make amazing meals that you and your family will adore! Be bold in the kitchen and experiment with new herbs. Create and implement new sauces with subtle nuances of flavor. You may find a brand new kind of food that you really enjoy! Use these tips, along with your taste buds to help you find your inner muse in the kitchen.